Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Conservation Genetics

Volume: 8 , Pages: 197-207.

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-006-9162-5

Language: English

Full reference: Ruokonen, M., Andersson, A.-C. & Tegelström, H. 2007. Using historical captive stocks in conservation. The case of the lesser white-fronted goose. Conservation Genetics 8: 197-207. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10592-006-9162-5

Keywords: Hybrid, Captive, Supplementation, Reintroduction, Lesser white-fronted goose, Anser erythropus

Abstract:

Many captive stocks of economically or otherwise valuable species were established before the decline of the wild population. These stocks are potentially valuable sources of genetic variability, but their taxonomic identity and actual value is often uncertain. We studied the genetics of captive stocks of the threatened lesser white-fronted goose Anser erythropus maintained in Sweden and elsewhere in Europe. Analyses of mtDNA and nuclear microsatellite markers revealed that 36% of the individuals had a hybrid ancestry. Because the parental species are closely related it is unlikely that our analyses detected all hybrid individuals in the material. Because no ancestral polymorphism or introgression was observed in samples of wild populations, it is likely that the observed hybridisation has occurred in captivity. As a consequence of founder effect, drift and hybridisation, captive stocks were genetically differentiated from the wild populations of the lesser white-fronted goose. The high level of genetic diversity in the captive stocks is explained at least partially by hybridisation. The present captive stocks of the lesser white-fronted goose are considered unsuitable for further reintroduction, or supplementation: hybridisation has involved three species, the number of hybrids is high, and all the investigated captive stocks are similarly affected. The results highlight the potential shortcomings of using captive-bred individuals in supplementation and reintroduction projects, when the captive stocks have not been pedigreed and bred according to conservation principles.

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ornis Svecica

Volume: 17 , Pages: 154-186.

Language: English

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Full reference: Kampe-Persson, H. & Lerner, H. 2007. Occurrence of hybrid geese in Sweden – a conservation problem? Ornis Svecica 17: 154-186.

Keywords: occurence, hybrids

Literature type: General

Journal: Vår Fågelvärld

Volume: 1/2007 , Pages: 22-25.

Language: Swedish

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Full reference: Engström, H. 2007. Hur skall det gå for fjällgåsen? Oförmåga till samsyn motverkar kraftfulla bevarandeinnsatser. [The future fate of the Lesser White-fronted Goose. Disagreements counteract effective conservation.], Vår Fågelvärld: 1/2007, 22-25.

Keywords: conservation

Literature type: General

Journal: Vår Fuglefauna

Volume: 28 , Pages: 171.

Language: Norwegian

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Full reference: Øien, I.J., Aarvak, T. & Ekker, M. 2005. Bevaring av dverggås langs den europeiske trekkruten. [Conservation of LWfG along the European migration route.], Vår Fuglefauna: 28, 171.

Keywords: conservation, status

Literature type: Report

Language: Greek (In Greek with English summary.)

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Full reference: Athanasiadis, A., Rigas, Y., Arapis, T. 2005. Restoration and conservation management of Drana lagoon in Evros delta. Final report LIFE 00NAT/GR/7198. [Restoration and conservation management of Drana lagoon in Evros delta. Final report LIFE 00NAT/GR/7198.]

Keywords: EU-Life

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Tolvanen, P., Bragina, T. & Bragin, E. 2004. Conservation work for the wetlands in Kustanay region, north-western Kazakstan, in 2001–2003. , In: Aarvak, T. & Timonen, S. (eds.). Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose conservation project. Report 2001-2003. WWF Finland Report No 20 & Norwegian Ornithological Society, NOF Rapportserie Report No 1-2004: pp. 41-43.

Keywords: Annual report, monitoring

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Conservation Genetics

Volume: 5 , Pages: 501-512.

DOI: 10.1023/B:COGE.0000041019.27119.b4

Language: English

Full reference: Ruokonen, M., Kvist, L., Aarvak, T., Markkola, J., Morozov, V.V., Øien, I.J., Syroechkovsky Jr., E.E., Tolvanen, P. & Lumme, J. 2004. Population genetic structure and conservation of the lesser white-fronted goose (Anser erythropus). Conservation Genetics 5: 501-512. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:COGE.0000041019.27119.b4

Keywords: Anser erythropus, lesser white-fronted goose, Palearctic, management unit, population genetic Structure

Abstract:

The lesser white-fronted goose is a sub-Arctic species with a currently fragmented breeding range, which extends from Fennoscandia to easternmost Siberia. The population started to decline at the beginning of the last century and, with a current world population estimate of 25,000 individuals, it is the most threatened of the Palearctic goose species. Of these, only 30–50 pairs breed in Fennoscandia. A fragment of the control region of mtDNA was sequenced from 110 individuals from four breeding, one staging and two wintering areas to study geographic subdivisions and gene flow. Sequences defined 15 mtDNA haplotypes that were assigned to two mtDNA lineages. Both the mtDNA lineages were found from all sampled localities indicating a common ancestry and/or some level of gene flow. Analyses of molecular variance showed significant structuring among populations (φ ST 0.220, P < 0.001). The results presented here together with ecological data indicate that the lesser white-fronted goose is fragmented into three distinctive subpopulations, and thus, the conservation status of the species should be reconsidered.

Literature type: Report

Language: English

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Full reference: Aarvak, T.& Timonen, S. 2004. Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose conservation project. Report 2001-2003. , WWF Finland Report No 20 & Norwegian Ornithological Society, NOF Rapportserie Report No 1-2004.

Keywords: Fennoscandian annual report

Literature type: General

Journal: Vår Fågelvärld

Volume: 3/2003 , Pages: 6-12.

Language: Swedish (In Swedish)

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Full reference: Øien, I.J. & Aarvak, T. 2003. Fjällgås. Finns det hopp för Skandinaviens ”sjungande gäss"? [Lesser White-fronted Goose. Is there hope for Scandinavias "singing goose"?], Vår Fågelvärld : 3/2003, 6-12.

Keywords: Scandinavia, Norway, Sweden, Finland, conservation, status

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Bird Conservation International

Volume: 13 , Pages: 213-226.

DOI: 10.1017/S0959270903003174

Language: English

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Full reference: Aarvak, T. & Øien, I.J. 2003. Moult and autumn migration of non-breeding Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus mapped by satellite telemetry. Bird Conservation International 13: 213-226. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270903003174

Keywords: migration

Abstract:

In this study we demonstrate that non-breeding adult Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus from the Fennoscandian breeding population may undertake long-distance moult migration eastwards. Of three individuals equipped with satellite transmitters at a spring staging site in northern Norway, two migrated to moulting sites in the area of Kolgujev Island and Kanin Peninsula, while the third headed towards the Taimyr Peninsula, all in northern Russia. The first leg of the moult migration route for non-breeders was between Finnmark, Norway and the Kanin Peninsula area in north-western Russia, a similar route to that taken on autumn migration by Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Geese that had bred successfully. After the moulting period, one of the individuals followed a south-western route to Poland and Germany, where it spent the first part of the winter. The satellite signals from the other two geese ceased abruptly in early autumn, indicating that the birds may have been illegally shot in Russia. Locating new moulting and migration stopover sites is of crucial importance for the conservation of the critically endangered Fennoscandian subpopulation of this species.

Number of results: 108