Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Bulletin of Nizhnevartovsk State University

Volume: 2020(1) , Pages: 98–103.

DOI: 10.36906/2311-4444/20-1/15

Language: Russian (In Russian with English summary)

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Full reference: Emtsev, A. A. & Porgunyov, A. V. 2020. Additional information about the lesser white-fronted goose migration stops in the Surgut district of the Khanty-Mansiysk autonomous okrug — Ugra and the problem of species conservation. Bulletin of Nizhnevartovsk State University 2020(1): 98–103. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.36906/2311-4444/20-1/15

Keywords: migration, hunting, conservation, central part of Western Siberia

Abstract:

The analysis of the photographs sent by the hunters from Sytomino village, Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug – Ugra, together with the further survey detected the place of migration stops of Lesser White-fronted Geese in the Middle Ob valley. The birds were staying at the small lake 3.5 km east of the village. On September 12, 2011, one wounded individual was found near the lake at the complex raised bog 9.5 km southwest of the city of Lyantor. Several ways can be suggested by us to save flying Lesser Whitefronted Geese and other species of vulnerable animals at the territory of the autonomous okrug. This will include the following measures to take: an obligatory exam for hunters to be able to identify some species of the regional fauna; large penalties for illegal hunting, more active propaganda of respect for nature and educational work and developing hunting culture. The article also covers economic and organizational issues.

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Nature Conservation Research

Volume: 4

DOI: 10.24189/ncr.2019.003

Language: English

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Full reference: Rozenfeld, S.B., Kirtaev, G.V., Rogova,N.V. & Soloviev, M.Y. 2019. Results of an aerial survey of the western population of Anser erythropus (Anserini) in autumn migration in Russia 2017. Nature Conservation Research 4. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.24189/ncr.2019.003

Keywords: aerial counts, Lesser White-fronted Goose, monitoring, Nenetsky Autonomous Okrug, Yamalo- Nenetsky Autonomous Okrug

Abstract:

The global population of Anser erythropus has rapidly declined since the middle of the 20th century. The decline in numbers has been accompanied by the fragmentation of the breeding range and is considered as «continuing affecting all populations, giving rise to fears that the species may go extinct». Overhunting, poaching and habitat loss are considered to be the main threats. The official estimate of the dimension of the decline is in the range of 30% to 49% between 1998 and 2008. Monitoring and the prospection of new areas are needed for the future conservation of this species. The eastern part of the Nenetsky Autonomous Okrug, the Baydaratskaya Bay and the Lower Ob (Dvuobye) are important territories for the Western main population of Anser erythropus on a flyway scale. Moving along the coast to the east, Anser erythropus can stay for a long time on the Barents Sea Coast, from where they fly over the Baydaratskaya Bay to the Dvuobye. We made aerial surveys and identified key sites and the main threats for Anser erythropus on this part of the flyway. According to our data, the numbers of the Western main population of Anser erythropus amount to 48 580 ± 2820 individuals after the breeding season, i.e. higher than the previous estimates made in autumn in Northern Kazakhstan. The key sites of Anser erythropus in this part of the flyway were identified.

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Cao, L., Fox, A.D., Morozov, V.V., Syroechkovskiy jr., E.E.. & Solovieva, D. 2018. , Pp. 38-39 in Fox, A.D. & Leafloor, J.O. (eds.). A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations (Component 2: Population accounts). CAFF: Akureyri, Iceland. ISBN 978-9935-431-74-5.

Keywords: population status, China, Easter Palearctic, East Russia, Japan

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Aarvak, T., Øien, I.J. & Morozov, V.V. 2018. Western main Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus. , Pp. 43-44 in Fox, A.D. & Leafloor, J.O. (eds.). A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations (Component 2: Population accounts). CAFF: Akureyri, Iceland. ISBN 978-9935-431-74-5.

Keywords: population status, Wester main, Russia

Literature type: General

Journal: Goose Bulletine

Volume: 22 , Pages: 17-24

Language: English

Full reference: Rozenfeld, S. & Kirtaev, G. 2017. Monitoring and identification of key sites of Lesser White-fronted goose (Anser erythropus) in Baydaratskaya Bay and adjacent territories. Goose Bulletine: 22, 17-24

Keywords: Russia, survey, Yamal Peninsula, Baydaratskaya Bay, ultra-light hydroplane, arial survey,

Literature type: General

Journal: Forktail

Volume: 33 , Pages: 81-87.

Language: English

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Full reference: Heim, W. & Smirensk, S.M. 2017. The importance of Muraviovka Park, Amur province, Far East Russia, for bird species threatened at regional, national and international level based on observations between 2011 and 2016. Forktail: 33, 81-87.

Literature type: Report

Language: English

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Full reference: Cuthbert, R. & Aarvak, T. 2017. Population estimates and survey methods for migratory goose species in Northern Kazakhstan. , AEWA Lesser White-fronted Goose International Working Group Report Series No. 5. Bonn, Germany. 96pp.

Keywords: population estimate, population size, survey, Kazakhstan, Russia, Kostanay, Kustanay, Akmola, North Kazakhstan,

Literature type: General

Journal: Goose Bulletin

Volume: 21 , Pages: 12-31.

Language: English

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Full reference: Rozenfeld, S., Kirtaev, G., Soloviev, M., Rogova, N. & Ivanov, M. 2016. The results of autumn counts of Lesser White-fronted Goose and other geese species in the Ob valley and White-sea-Baltic flyway in September. Goose Bulletin: 21, 12-31.

Keywords: Russia, numbers, survey, ultra-light aircraft, density. Distribution, autumn, Ob-valley, Yamalo-Nenetski Autonomous District, Khanty-Mansiiski Autonomous District, Nenets Autonomous District

Literature type: Report

Language: English

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Full reference: Rozenfeld, S. (comp). 2016. Small-Scale Funding Agreement (2015-2) ‘Conservation of the globally threatened Lesser White-fronted goose’ Final report. , 102pp.

Keywords: Russia, satellite tracking, survey

Literature type: Report

Language: English

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Full reference: Morozov, V.V., Øien, I.J. & Aarvak, T. 2016. Monitoring and satellite tracking of Lesser White-fronted Geese from the Russian European tundra in Russia in 2015. , NOF-BirdLife Norway - Report 2-2016. 13pp.

Keywords: Polar Urals, Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Bolshaya Rogovaya River, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Russia, production

Abstract:

Fieldwork was carried out between 6th June and 10th August 2015 at the western macro-slope of the Polar Urals and the eastern Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Russia. In the Bolshaya Rogovaya River basin area, only one LWfG pair with five juveniles was located. However, the numbers of Bean Geese were high, with 92 adults and at least 58 juveniles in the same area. In the Polar Urals, Lesser White-fronted Geese were found on the rivers or watershed lakes in June, but repeated observations carried out in July and early August did not confirm the presence of LWfG, but also here many broods of Bean Goose were observed. Altogether, three broods of LWfG were found in one flock. One adult male was caught by a hoop net during fieldwork and equipped with a solar powered GPS satellite transmitter. This male LWfG migrated southwards along the Ob river valley, through Kazakhstan, but instead of crossing over to the western side of the Caspian Sea as expected, he was tracked to Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. This is the first time that a Lesser White-fronted Goose has been tracked to this probably very important wintering area which is situated in the border area between Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. By 7th January 2016 the bird was still alive and with a functioning transmitter.

Number of results: 154