Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Thesis

Language: English

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Full reference: Marolla, F. 2020. Understanding and forecasting population dynamics in changing arctic ecosystems. A holistic approach to study the effects of environmental changes on arctic populations of management concern. , Doctoral thesis, Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, The Arctic University of Norway.

Keywords: population dynamics, culling, mortality, production, Fennoscandia

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ibis

Volume: 155 , Pages: 576–592.

DOI: 10.1111/ibi.12039

Language: English

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Full reference: Wang, W., Fox, A.D., Cong, P. & Cao, L. 2013. Food constraints explain the restricted distribution of wintering Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus in China. Ibis 155: 576–592. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12039

Keywords: food, China, management, East Dongting Lake, energy budget, goose foraging,

Abstract:

More than 90% of the Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus in the Eastern Palearctic flyway population winter at East Dongting Lake, China. To explain this restricted distribution and to understand better the winter feeding ecology and habitat requirements of this poorly known species, we assessed their food availability, diet and energy budgets at this site through two winters. Lesser White-fronted Geese maintained a positive energy budget when feeding on above-ground green production of Eleocharis and Alopecurus in recessional grasslands in autumn and spring to accumulate fat stores. Such food was severely depleted by late November and showed no growth in mid-winter. Geese fed on more extensive old-growth Carex sedge meadows in mid-winter where they were in energy deficit and depleted endogenous fat stores. Geese failed to accumulate autumn fat stores in one year when high water levels prevented the Geese from using recessional grassland feeding areas. Fat stores remained lower throughout that winter and Geese left for breeding areas later in spring than in the previous year, perhaps reflecting the need to gain threshold fat stores for migration. Sedge meadows are widespread at other Yangtze River floodplain wetlands, but recessional grasslands are rare and perhaps restricted to parts of East Dongting Lake, which would explain the highly localized distribution of Lesser White-fronted Geese in China and their heavy use of these habitats at this site. Sympathetic management of water tables is essential to maintain the recessional grasslands in the best condition for Geese. Regular depletion of fat stores whilst grazing sedge meadows in mid-winter also underlines the need to protect the species from unnecessary anthropogenic disturbances that enhance energy expenditure. The specialized diet of the Lesser White-fronted Goose may explain its highly restricted winter distribution and global rarity.

Literature type: Action Plan

Language: Hungarian (In Hungarian with English summary)

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Full reference: Bogyó, D., Ecsedi, Z., Tar, J. & Zalai, T. 2013. A kis lilik (Anser erythropus) magyarorszagi fajmegörzesi terve. [Hungarian National Action Plan for Lesser White-fronted Goose (Anser erythropus).] , Ministry of Rural Development, State Secretariat for Environmental Affairs. 93pp.

Keywords: action plan, Hungary, management, conservation, roosting, feeding, actions

Literature type: Action Plan

Language: English

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Full reference: The Norwegian Directorate for Nature Management. 2011. Norwegian action plan for the Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus. , DN-report 4-2011.

Keywords: Action Plan, Norway, monitoring, threats, measures

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Toming, M. & Tolvanen, P. 2009. Restoration and management of the Lesser White-fronted Goose habitats in Matsalu, Estonia. , In: Tolvanen, P., Øien, I.J. & Ruokolainen, K. (eds.). Conservation of Lesser White-fronted Goose on the European migration route. Final report of the EU LIFE-Nature project 2005–2009. WWF Finland Report 27 & NOF Rapportserie Report No 1-2009: pp. 22-23.

Keywords: monitoring, EU-Life, annual report, Fennoscandian

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Øien, I.J. & Aarvak, T. 2009. The eff ect of Red Fox culling in the core breeding area for Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Geese in 2008. , In: Tolvanen, P., Øien, I.J. & Ruokolainen, K. (eds.). Conservation of Lesser White-fronted Goose on the European migration route. Final report of the EU LIFE-Nature project 2005–2009. WWF Finland Report 27 & NOF Rapportserie Report No 1-2009: pp. 81-82.

Keywords: monitoring, EU-Life, annual report, Fennoscandian, Norway, management

Literature type: Thesis

Language: English

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Full reference: Niemelä, M. 2009. Biotic interactions and vegetation management on coastal meadows. , Acta Universitatis Ouluensis. A Scientiae Rerum Naturalium 360. Faculty of Science, University of Oulu, Finland.

Keywords: cattle, coastal meadow, diet of geese, grazing, management, plant\ncompetition, plant parasitism, threatened species, vegetation succession, Finland, Bothnian Bay

Abstract:

Conservation of rare habitats and species are central elements in the management of semi-natural grasslands of high biodiversity. Understanding the impacts of various abiotic and biotic interactions and management methods on threatened species is fundamental to their conservation. In the present study, effects of competition, plant parasitism, grazing and mowing were studied at the community level in Bothnian Bay coastal meadows and in greenhouse. This was the first time when the impacts of various biotic interactions on the critically endangered creeping alkali grass (Puccinellia phryganodes) have been explored in detail in one of its rare occurrences in the boreal vegetation zone in Europe. In addition, questions related to ecological and economical sustainability of cattle grazing on coastal meadows were examined. Puccinellia phryganodes was found to suffer severely from competition with taller graminoids. Simulated and actual grazing by greylag goose, Anser anser, as well as infection by a hemiparasitic plant, Odontites litoralis, were found to indirectly benefit P. phryganodes by decreasing the competitive advantage of its competitors. In spite of the relatively intensive grazing by greylag goose in the field, P. phryganodes experienced a drastic decrease during four years in the grazed experimental quadrats and simultaneously the proportion of the taller graminoids increased substantially. Primary succession of coastal meadow vegetation was found to progress rapidly and continuous formation of suitable open habitats is therefore crucial for the subordinate species. Mowing was found to be an effective management method for some threatened plant species in coastal meadows, but not for P. phryganodes, which would probably benefit more, for example, from livestock grazing. Both lightly and rather intensively managed large open meadows could provide optimal habitats for the critically endangered lesser white fronted goose (Anser erythropus) as well as for the greylag goose. The relatively low and variable yield of the coastal meadow vegetation compared to that of cultivated grasslands sets limits how management by cattle grazing can be implemented. Key factors for both the biodiversity management and livestock production in coastal meadows are timing of the grazing season, intensity of grazing and selection of suitable types of animals.

Literature type: Report

Language: Greek (In Greek with English summary.)

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Full reference: Athanasiadis, A., Rigas, Y., Arapis, T. 2005. Restoration and conservation management of Drana lagoon in Evros delta. Final report LIFE 00NAT/GR/7198. [Restoration and conservation management of Drana lagoon in Evros delta. Final report LIFE 00NAT/GR/7198.]

Keywords: EU-Life

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Conservation Genetics

Volume: 5 , Pages: 501-512.

DOI: 10.1023/B:COGE.0000041019.27119.b4

Language: English

Full reference: Ruokonen, M., Kvist, L., Aarvak, T., Markkola, J., Morozov, V.V., Øien, I.J., Syroechkovsky Jr., E.E., Tolvanen, P. & Lumme, J. 2004. Population genetic structure and conservation of the lesser white-fronted goose (Anser erythropus). Conservation Genetics 5: 501-512. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:COGE.0000041019.27119.b4

Keywords: Anser erythropus, lesser white-fronted goose, Palearctic, management unit, population genetic Structure

Abstract:

The lesser white-fronted goose is a sub-Arctic species with a currently fragmented breeding range, which extends from Fennoscandia to easternmost Siberia. The population started to decline at the beginning of the last century and, with a current world population estimate of 25,000 individuals, it is the most threatened of the Palearctic goose species. Of these, only 30–50 pairs breed in Fennoscandia. A fragment of the control region of mtDNA was sequenced from 110 individuals from four breeding, one staging and two wintering areas to study geographic subdivisions and gene flow. Sequences defined 15 mtDNA haplotypes that were assigned to two mtDNA lineages. Both the mtDNA lineages were found from all sampled localities indicating a common ancestry and/or some level of gene flow. Analyses of molecular variance showed significant structuring among populations (φ ST 0.220, P < 0.001). The results presented here together with ecological data indicate that the lesser white-fronted goose is fragmented into three distinctive subpopulations, and thus, the conservation status of the species should be reconsidered.

Literature type: Rep.article

Language: English

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Full reference: Timonen, S. & Niemelä, M. 1999. The management plan for the coastal meadows of Säärenperä. , In: Tolvanen, P., Øien, I.J. & Ruokolainen, K. (eds.). Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose conservation project. Annual report 1998. WWF Finland Report 10 & Norwegian Ornithological Society, NOF rapportserie Report No 1-1999.: pp. 21.

Keywords: conservation, monitoring, Fennoscandian annual

Number of results: 11