Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ecology and Evolution

Volume: 2021;00 , Pages: 1-14.

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.7310

Language: English

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Full reference: Tian, H., Solovyeva, d., Danilov, G., Vartanyan, S., Wen,L., Lei, J., Lu, C., Bridgewater, P., Lei, G. & Zeng, Q. 2021. Combining modern tracking data and historical records improves understanding of the summer habitats of the Eastern Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus. Ecology and Evolution 2021;00: 1-14. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.7310

Keywords: Asia, Arctic, eastern population, GPS tracking, Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus, species distribution modeling, summer range

Abstract:

The Lesser White-fronted Goose (Anser erythropus), smallest of the “gray” geese, is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List and protected in all range states. There are three populations, with the least studied being the Eastern population, shared between Russia and China. The extreme remoteness of breeding enclaves makes them largely inaccessible to researchers. As a substitute for visitation, remotely tracking birds from wintering grounds allows exploration of their summer range. Over a period of three years, and using highly accurate GPS tracking devices, eleven individuals of A. erythropus were tracked from the key wintering site of China, to summering, and staging sites in northeastern Russia. Data obtained from that tracking, bolstered byground survey and literature records, were used to model the summer distribution of A. erythropus. Although earlier literature describes a patchy summer range, the model suggests a contiguous summer habitat range is possible, although observations to date cannot confirm A. erythropus is present throughout the modeled range. The most suitable habitats are located along the coasts of the Laptev Sea, primarily the Lena Delta, in the Yana-Kolyma Lowland, and smaller lowlands of Chukotka with narrow riparian extensions upstream along major rivers such as the Lena, Indigirka,and Kolyma. The probability of A. erythropus presence is related to areas with altitude less than 500 m with abundant wetlands, especially riparian habitat, and a climate with precipitation of the warmest quarter around 55 mm and mean temperature around 14°C during June-August. Human disturbance also affects site suitability, with a gradual decrease in species presence starting around 160 km from human settlements. Remote tracking of animal species can bridge the knowledge gap required for robust estimation of species distribution patterns in remote areas. Better knowledge of species' distribution is important in understanding the large-scale ecological consequences of rapid global change and establishing conservation management strategies.

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ecology and Evolution

Volume: 10 , Pages: 5281-5292.

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.6272

Language: English

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Full reference: Pingyang, Z., Ye-ai, Z., Yonghong, X., Siqi, Z., Xinsheng, C., Feng, L., Zhengmiao, D., Hong, Z. & Wei, T. 2020. Hydrology-driven responses of herbivorous geese in relation to changes in food quantity and quality. Ecology and Evolution 10: 5281-5292. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6272

Keywords: Bean goose, diet, Dongting Lake, wetland, food shortage, habitat selection, China

Abstract:

East Dongting Lake is a Ramsar site and a particularly important wintering ground for herbivorous geese along the East Asian‐Australasian Flyway. The operation of the Three Gorges Dam has changed the water regime and has a significant impact on wetland ecosystems downstream. We studied the responses of two sympatric herbivorous goose species, the Lesser white‐fronted goose Anser erythropus and Bean goose Anser fabalis, to habitat change by investigating their food conditions, habitat selection, and diet composition in the wintering periods of 2016/2017 and 2017/2018, which had early and late water recession, respectively. It was expected that the contrasting water regimes would result in different food conditions and geese responses. The results showed that the food quality and quantity differed significantly between winters. As responses to the high‐quantity/low‐quality food during 2016/2017, more geese switched to feeding on mudflat and exploited plants such as dicotyledons and moss. The tall swards of Carex spp. (dominant plants in the meadow) that developed during the first growing season decreased the food accessibility during the second growing season and hindered the exploitation of newly generated shoots by the geese, which was further confirmed by our clipping control experiment. Nearly all the geese chose to feed on meadow, and Carex spp. made up the majority of their diet in 2017/2018 when there was more low‐quantity/high‐quality food. Compared with the globally vulnerable Lesser white‐fronted geese, the larger‐sized Bean geese seemed to be less susceptible to winter food shortages and exhibited more stable responses. We concluded that the food quality–quantity condition was the external factor influencing the geese responses, while morphological and physiological traits could be the internal factors causing different responses between the two species. This study enhanced the understanding of the influence that habitat change exerts on herbivorous geese in their wintering site in the context of the Three Gorges Dam operation. We suggested that regulating hydrological regime was important in terms of wetland management and species conservation.

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Russian Journal of Ecology

Volume: 41 , Pages: 63-66.

Language: Russian (In Russian)

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Full reference: Romanov, A.A. & Pospelov, I.N. 2012. [Intracontinental spatial connections of lesser white-fronted geese (Anser erythropus) from mountain subarctic regions of the Central Palearctic], Russian Journal of Ecology 41: 63-66.

Keywords: Putorana, migration, satellite telemetry,

Literature type: Red list

Language: English (In English and Mongolian)

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Full reference: Gombobaatar, S. & Monks, E.M., Seidler, R., Sumyia, D., Tseveenmyadag, N., Bayarkhuu, S., Baillie, J.E., Boldbataar, Sh. & Uuganbayar, Ch. 2011. Mongolian Red List of birds. , Regional red list of birds. Vol.7. Zoological Society of London, National university of Mongolia & Mongolian ornithological Society.

Keywords: Red list, Mongolia, taxonomy, distribution, ecology, threats, conservation

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Molecular Ecology

Volume: 19 , Pages: 2408-2417.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04653.x

Language: English

Full reference: Ruokonen, M., Aarvak, T., Chesser, R.K., Lundqvist, A.-C. & Merilä, J. 2010. Temporal increase in mtDNA diversity in a declining population. Molecular Ecology 19: 2408-2417. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04653.x

Keywords: genetics

Abstract:

In small and declining populations levels of genetic variability are expected to be reduced due to effects of inbreeding and random genetic drift. As a result, both individual fitness and populations’ adaptability can be compromised, and the probability of extinction increased. Therefore, maintenance of genetic variability is a crucial goal in conservation biology. Here we show that although the level of genetic variability in mtDNA of the endangered Fennoscandian lesser white-fronted goose Anser erythropus population is currently lower than in the neigbouring populations, it has increased six-fold during the past 140 years despite the precipitously declining population. The explanation for increased genetic diversity in Fennoscandia appears to be recent spontaneous increase in male immigration rate equalling 0.56 per generation. This inference is supported by data on nuclear microsatellite markers, the latter of which show that the current and the historical Fennoscandian populations are significantly differentiated (FST = 0.046, P = 0) due to changes in allele frequencies. The effect of male-mediated gene flow is potentially dichotomous. On the one hand it may rescue the Fennoscandian lesser white-fronted goose from loss of genetic variability, but on the other hand, it eradicates the original genetic characteristics of this population.

Literature type: Report

Language: English

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Full reference: Vangeluwe, D. 2005. The Drana marshes (Evros Delta, Greece), a question of survival for the European population of Anser erythropus. With data on the occurrence and ecology of the Red-breasted Goose Branta ruficollis. , Report of Life-Nature program “Restoration and Conservation Management of the Drana Lagoon in the Evros Delta (Greece)”, Institute royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique.

Keywords: occurence

Literature type: General

Journal: IWRB Goose Research Group Bulletin

Volume: 45 , Pages: 9-14.

Language: English

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Full reference: Sterbetz, I. 1978. The feeding ecology of Anser albifrons, Anser erythropus, and Anser fabalis in Hungary. IWRB Goose Research Group Bulletin: 45, 9-14.

Number of results: 7