Portal to the Lesser White-fronted Goose

- by the Fennoscandian Lesser White-fronted Goose project

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ecology and Evolution

Volume: 2021;00 , Pages: 1-14.

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.7310

Language: English

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Full reference: Tian, H., Solovyeva, d., Danilov, G., Vartanyan, S., Wen,L., Lei, J., Lu, C., Bridgewater, P., Lei, G. & Zeng, Q. 2021. Combining modern tracking data and historical records improves understanding of the summer habitats of the Eastern Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus. Ecology and Evolution 2021;00: 1-14. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.7310

Keywords: Asia, Arctic, eastern population, GPS tracking, Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus, species distribution modeling, summer range

Abstract:

The Lesser White-fronted Goose (Anser erythropus), smallest of the “gray” geese, is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List and protected in all range states. There are three populations, with the least studied being the Eastern population, shared between Russia and China. The extreme remoteness of breeding enclaves makes them largely inaccessible to researchers. As a substitute for visitation, remotely tracking birds from wintering grounds allows exploration of their summer range. Over a period of three years, and using highly accurate GPS tracking devices, eleven individuals of A. erythropus were tracked from the key wintering site of China, to summering, and staging sites in northeastern Russia. Data obtained from that tracking, bolstered byground survey and literature records, were used to model the summer distribution of A. erythropus. Although earlier literature describes a patchy summer range, the model suggests a contiguous summer habitat range is possible, although observations to date cannot confirm A. erythropus is present throughout the modeled range. The most suitable habitats are located along the coasts of the Laptev Sea, primarily the Lena Delta, in the Yana-Kolyma Lowland, and smaller lowlands of Chukotka with narrow riparian extensions upstream along major rivers such as the Lena, Indigirka,and Kolyma. The probability of A. erythropus presence is related to areas with altitude less than 500 m with abundant wetlands, especially riparian habitat, and a climate with precipitation of the warmest quarter around 55 mm and mean temperature around 14°C during June-August. Human disturbance also affects site suitability, with a gradual decrease in species presence starting around 160 km from human settlements. Remote tracking of animal species can bridge the knowledge gap required for robust estimation of species distribution patterns in remote areas. Better knowledge of species' distribution is important in understanding the large-scale ecological consequences of rapid global change and establishing conservation management strategies.

Literature type: General

Journal: Tringa

Volume: 2/2020 , Pages: 47-50.

Language: Finnish (In Finnish)

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Full reference: Tolvanen, P. 2020. Voiko Tringan alueella vielä nähdä villin ja vapaan kiljuhanhen? [Is it still possible to see a wild LWfG in of the region of Uusimaa, southern Finland?], Tringa: 2/2020, 47-50.

Keywords: Finland, occurrence, distribution, numbers, population size, satellite tracking, mr. Blue

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume: 16 , Pages: 1147.

DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16071147

Language: English

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Full reference: Jialin, L., Yifei, J., Aojie, Z., Qing, Z., Inlu, S., Yan, Z., Hong Z., Cai, L., Guangchun, L. & Li W. 2019. Bird satellite tracking revealed critical protection gaps in East Asian–Australasian flyway. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16: 1147. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071147

Keywords: migration route, stopover, utilization distribution, Croplands, Northeast China Plains, Bohai Bay

Abstract:

Most migratory birds depend on stopover sites, which are essential for refueling during migration and affect their population dynamics. In the East Asian–Australasian Flyway (EAAF), however, the stopover ecology of migratory waterfowl is severely under-studied. The knowledge gaps regarding the timing, intensity and duration of stopover site usages prevent the development of effective and full annual cycle conservation strategies for migratory waterfowl in EAAF. In this study, we obtained a total of 33,493 relocations and visualized 33 completed spring migratory paths of five geese species using satellite tracking devices. We delineated 2,192,823 ha as the key stopover sites along the migration routes and found that croplands were the largest land use type within the stopover sites, followed by wetlands and natural grasslands (62.94%, 17.86% and 15.48% respectively). We further identified the conservation gaps by overlapping the stopover sites with the World Database on Protected Areas (PA). The results showed that only 15.63% (or 342,757 ha) of the stopover sites are covered by the current PA network. Our findings fulfil some key knowledge gaps for the conservation of the migratory waterbirds along the EAAF, thus enabling an integrative conservation strategy for migratory water birds in the flyway.

Literature type: General

Journal: Goose Bulletin

Volume: 21 , Pages: 12-31.

Language: English

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Full reference: Rozenfeld, S., Kirtaev, G., Soloviev, M., Rogova, N. & Ivanov, M. 2016. The results of autumn counts of Lesser White-fronted Goose and other geese species in the Ob valley and White-sea-Baltic flyway in September. Goose Bulletin: 21, 12-31.

Keywords: Russia, numbers, survey, ultra-light aircraft, density. Distribution, autumn, Ob-valley, Yamalo-Nenetski Autonomous District, Khanty-Mansiiski Autonomous District, Nenets Autonomous District

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Bird Conservation International

Volume: 26 , Pages: 397-417.

DOI: 10.1017/S0959270915000386

Language: English

Full reference: Jia, Q., Koyama, K., Choi, C.-Y., Kim, H.-J., Cao, L., Liu, G. & Fox, A. 2016. Population estimates and geographical distributions of swans and geese in East Asia based on counts during the non-breeding season. Bird Conservation International 26: 397-417. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270915000386

Keywords: Population size, survey, South Korea, Japan, China,

Abstract:

For the first time, we estimated the population sizes of two swan species and four goose species from observations during the non-breeding period in East Asia. Based on combined counts from South Korea, Japan and China, we estimated the total abundance of these species as follows: 42,000–47,000 Whooper Swans Cygnus cygnus; 99,000–141,000 Tundra Swans C. columbianus bewickii; 56,000–98,000 Swan Geese Anser cygnoides; 157,000–194,000 Bean Geese A. fabalis; 231,000–283,000 Greater White-fronted Geese A. albifrons; and 14,000–19,000 Lesser White-fronted Geese A. erythropus. While the count data from Korea and Japan provide a good reflection of numbers present, there remain gaps in the coverage in China, which particularly affect the precision of the estimates for Bean, Greater and Lesser White-fronted Geese as well as Tundra Swans. Lack of subspecies distinction of Bean Geese in China until recently also limits our ability to determine the true status of A. f. middendorffii there, but all indications suggest this population numbers around 18,000 individuals and is in need of urgent attention. The small, highly concentrated and declining numbers of Lesser White-fronted Geese give concern for this species, as do the major declines in Greater White-fronted Geese in China (in contrast to numbers in Japan and Korea, considered to be a separate flyway). In the absence of any demographic data, it is impossible to interpret the causes of these changes in abundance. Improved monitoring, including demographic and tracking studies are required to provide the necessary information to retain populations in favourable conservation status.

Literature type: Report

DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.31858.30404

Language: English

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Full reference: Aarvak, T., Øien, I.J. & Shimmings, P. 2016. A critical review of Lesser White-fronted Goose release projects. , NOF-report 2016-6. 218 pp.

Keywords: release project, reintroduction, translocation, illegal, genetic, distribution, population, court case, hybrid, barnacle goose, carrier species

Literature type: Report

Language: English (In Chinese & English)

Full reference: Liying, S. & Lifang, T. (eds). 2015. Synchronized counts for migratory cranes and waterbirds in spring 2015. , Cranes and waterbirds migration briefs 2015 No.5. 19pp.

Keywords: counts, China, distribution

Literature type: Scientific

Journal: Ibis

Volume: 155 , Pages: 576–592.

DOI: 10.1111/ibi.12039

Language: English

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Full reference: Wang, W., Fox, A.D., Cong, P. & Cao, L. 2013. Food constraints explain the restricted distribution of wintering Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus in China. Ibis 155: 576–592. https://www.dx.doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12039

Keywords: food, China, management, East Dongting Lake, energy budget, goose foraging,

Abstract:

More than 90% of the Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus in the Eastern Palearctic flyway population winter at East Dongting Lake, China. To explain this restricted distribution and to understand better the winter feeding ecology and habitat requirements of this poorly known species, we assessed their food availability, diet and energy budgets at this site through two winters. Lesser White-fronted Geese maintained a positive energy budget when feeding on above-ground green production of Eleocharis and Alopecurus in recessional grasslands in autumn and spring to accumulate fat stores. Such food was severely depleted by late November and showed no growth in mid-winter. Geese fed on more extensive old-growth Carex sedge meadows in mid-winter where they were in energy deficit and depleted endogenous fat stores. Geese failed to accumulate autumn fat stores in one year when high water levels prevented the Geese from using recessional grassland feeding areas. Fat stores remained lower throughout that winter and Geese left for breeding areas later in spring than in the previous year, perhaps reflecting the need to gain threshold fat stores for migration. Sedge meadows are widespread at other Yangtze River floodplain wetlands, but recessional grasslands are rare and perhaps restricted to parts of East Dongting Lake, which would explain the highly localized distribution of Lesser White-fronted Geese in China and their heavy use of these habitats at this site. Sympathetic management of water tables is essential to maintain the recessional grasslands in the best condition for Geese. Regular depletion of fat stores whilst grazing sedge meadows in mid-winter also underlines the need to protect the species from unnecessary anthropogenic disturbances that enhance energy expenditure. The specialized diet of the Lesser White-fronted Goose may explain its highly restricted winter distribution and global rarity.

Literature type: General

Journal: Goose Bulletin

Volume: 17 , Pages: 10-18.

Language: English

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Full reference: Kruckenberg, H. & Krüger, T. 2013. Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus in Lower Saxony (NW Germany) – status, distribution and numbers 1900–2007. Goose Bulletin: 17, 10-18.

Keywords: status, distribution, numbers, Germany, Lower Saxony

Abstract:

In the period from 1907/08 to 2006/07, i.e. 100 winters, 156 records of 261 Lesser White-fronted Geese Anser erythropus were reported in Lower Saxony. The first records were from 9 December 1907. For the period before 1970, only accidental occurrences were reported. A large increase in the number of records occurred in the 1990s and continued in the 2000s. Since the mid-1990s, the Lesser White-fronted Goosehas become a regular, annually occurring migratory bird in Lower Saxony. There is evidence of a concentration of records in the north-west of Lower Saxony in the region of East Frisia, especially in the Dollart-Lower Ems-Region (Rheiderland, Emsmarschen) and the Krummhörn including Leybucht, which are key sites of the occurrence. Other important sites are the Middle Elbe and the Lower Elbe. During autumn migration, the first Lesser White-fronted Geese reach Lower Saxony in mid-October. From early December the numbers rise steadily until early March and peak in the first decade of March (median = 2 March). After that the numbers decrease but birds remain until the first third of April at a relatively high level, and birds are gone by the end of April. In 139 cases (92.1%), Lesser White-fronted Geese were recorded only on a single day, longer stays were reported only twelve times (7.9%, n = 151 records), the longest 27 days, indicating overwintering. About 93% of all observations of Lesser White-fronted Geese refer to birds which were associated in only small flocks of three individuals, and often only single birds (68.6%) occurred (n = 156 flocks and 261 ind.). “Large” flocks have been recorded rarely. 141 Lesser White-fronted Geese were reported as adult birds (86.5%), with only 21 individuals identified as juveniles (13.5%, n = 163). In 75% of records since the mid-1990s (73%, n = 70 records) Lesser White-fronted Geese were roosting with White-fronted Geese A. albifrons. In 19% of the records they were with Barnacle Geese Branta bernicla, and in 9 % with Greylag Geese A. anser. There is a high likelihood of confusion between Lesser White-fronted Geese and Whitefronted Geese during goose hunting, which is usually practiced at dusk at the night roosts of both species. Therefore, to collect data for better protection of Lesser Whitefronted Geese in Lower Saxony we started a new research programme in autumn 2012 involving field research, satellite tracking and colour-marking as well as an awareness campaign for birders, hunters and the general public.

Literature type: General

Language: English

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Full reference: Degtyaryev, V.G., Egorov, N.N., Ochlopkov, I.I., Oleinikov, O.B. & Tomshin, M.D. 2013. Lesser White-fronted Goose in the Lena and Olenek Rivers catchment, Siberia. Pp. 60-61 in Young, G, M Williams, B Hughes & C Hall (eds). 2013. TWSG News, Bulletin of the IUCN-SSC/Wetlands International Threatened Waterfowl Specialist Group, No. 16. Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, UK.

Keywords: breeding, distribution, numbers, Siberia, status, Russia

Number of results: 49